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Version: 3.9.0-beta.62 (Latest)

Writing PlayWright Tests

Our Playwright tests are written using the Playwright test framework. We use these tests to test our OHIF Viewer and ensure that it is working as expected.

In this guide, we will show you how to write Playwright tests for the OHIF Viewer.

Using a specific study and mode

If you would like to use a specific study, you can use the studyInstanceUID property to reference the study you would like to visit. for example, if you would like to use the study with StudyInstanceUID 2.16.840.1.114362.1.11972228.22789312658.616067305.306.2 and the mode Basic Viewer, you can use the following code snippet:

import { test } from '@playwright/test';
import { visitStudy, checkForScreenshot, screenShotPaths } from './utils/index.js';

test.beforeEach(async ({ page }) => {
const studyInstanceUID = '2.16.840.1.114362.1.11972228.22789312658.616067305.306.2';
const mode = 'Basic Viewer';
await visitStudy(page, studyInstanceUID, mode);
});

test.describe('Some Test', async () => {
test('should do something.', async ({ page }) => {
// Your test code here...
});
});

Screenshots

A good way to check your tests is working as expected is to capture screenshots at different stages of the test. You can use our checkForScreenshot function located in tests/utils/checkForScreenshot.ts to capture screenshots. You should also plan your screenshots in advance, screenshots need to be defined in the tests/utils/screenshotPaths.ts file. For example, if you would to capture a screenshot after a measurement is added, you can define a screenshot path like this:

const screenShotPaths = {
your_test_name: {
measurementAdded: 'measurementAdded.png',
measurementRemoved: 'measurementRemoved.png',
},
};

It's okay if the screenshot doesn't exist yet, this will be dealt with in the next step. Once you have defined your screenshot path, you can use the checkForScreenshot function in your test to capture the screenshot. For example, if you would like to capture a screenshot of the page after a measurement is added, you can use the following code snippet:

import { test } from '@playwright/test';
import {
visitStudy,
checkForScreenshot,
screenshotPath,
} from './utils/index.js';

test.beforeEach(async ({ page }) => {
const studyInstanceUID = '2.16.840.1.114362.1.11972228.22789312658.616067305.306.2';
const mode = 'Basic Viewer';
await visitStudy(page, studyInstanceUID, mode);
});

test.describe('Some test', async () => {
test('should do something', async ({ page }) => {
// Your test code here to add a measurement
await checkForScreenshot(
page,
page,
screenshotPath.your_test_name.measurementAdded
);
});
});

The test will automatically fail the first time you run it, it will however generate the screenshot for you, you will notice 3 new entries in the tests/screenshots folder, under chromium/your-test.spec.js/measurementAdded.png, firefox/your-test.spec.js/measurementAdded.png and webkit/your-test.spec.js/measurementAdded.png folders. You can now run the test again and it will use those screenshots to compare against the current state of the example. Please verify that the ground truth screenshots are correct before committing them or testing against them.

Simulating mouse drags

If you would like to simulate a mouse drag, you can use the simulateDrag function located in tests/utils/simulateDrag.ts. You can use this function to simulate a mouse drag on an element. For example, if you would like to simulate a mouse drag on the cornerstone-canvas element, you can use the following code snippet:

import {
visitStudy,
checkForScreenshot,
screenShotPaths,
simulateDrag,
} from './utils/index.js';

test.beforeEach(async ({ page }) => {
const studyInstanceUID = '2.16.840.1.114362.1.11972228.22789312658.616067305.306.2';
const mode = 'Basic Viewer';
await visitStudy(page, studyInstanceUID, mode);
});

test.describe('Some Test', async () => {
test('should do something..', async ({
page,
}) => {
const locator = page.locator('.cornerstone-canvas');
await simulateDrag(page, locator);
});
});

Our simulate drag utility can simulate a drag on any element, and avoid going out of bounds. It will calculuate the bounding box of the element and ensure that the drag stays within the bounds of the element. This should be good enough for most tools, and better than providing custom x, and y coordinates which can be error prone and make the code difficult to maintain.

Running the tests

After you have wrote your tests, you can run them by using the following command:

yarn test:e2e:ci

If you want to use headed mode, you can use the following command:

yarn test:e2e:headed

You will see the test results in your terminal, if you want an indepth report, you can use the following command:

yarn playwright show-report tests/playwright-report

Serving the viewer manually for development

By default, when you run the tests, it will call the yarn start command to serve the viewer first, then run the tests, if you would like to serve the viewer manually, you can use the same command. The viewer will be available at http://localhost:3000. This could speed up your development process since playwright will skip this step and use the existing server on port 3000.

Accessing services, managers, configs and cornerstone in your tests

If you would like to access the cornerstone3D, services, or command managers in your tests, you can use the page.evaluate function to access them. For example, if you would like to access the services so you can show a UI notifcation using the uiNotifcationService, you can use the following code snippet:

  await page.evaluate(({ services }: AppTypes.Test) => {
const { uiNotificationService } = services;
uiNotificationService.show({
title: 'Test',
message: 'This is a test',
type: 'info',
});
}, await page.evaluateHandle('window'));

Playwright VSCode Extension and Recording Tests

If you are using VSCode, you can use the Playwright extension to help you write your tests. The extension provides a test runner and many great features such as picking a locator using your mouse, recording a new test, and more. You can install the extension by searching for Playwright in the extensions tab in VSCode or by visiting the Playwright extension page.